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To successfully market yourself, especially if you are trying to get into a different career, sell your skills and experience rather than your job descriptions.

Write a new definition of “who” you are in the workplace.  Avoid identifying yourself with the job description but rather identify yourself as a package of skills.  This keeps you from determining your value and security by your position.  The closer you tie your self-image to your job, the more you will feel its loss if your position is eliminated. 

Example:  Think of how many skills an administrative assistant must use:  desktop publisher, work-life organizer/scheduler, writer, negotiator, mediator, gatekeeper, skilled company representative, etc.  This is in addition to answering phones, filing, word processing and spreadsheets.  What are your contributions and the impact you can have on the prospective company?  Be creative!

Examine your history by compiling a comprehensive list of as many achievements, both personal and professional, as you can.  Include:  personal achievements (which contain valuable and saleable skills).   Write a page describing each achievement.  Use action words like organize, negotiate, lead, create, sell.  These are clues to your skills.  Review the list and notice recurring patterns.  Use this list as the basis for your skill-based resume.

When thinking of ways to market yourself into a new position, be creative in thinking about all of the experience you have had using the skills the company is looking for but maybe weren’t part of your previous job descriptions.  Most of us have a myriad of skills that we have used in professional organizations (leader–president of the group for example; promoter/sales; fundraiser; treasurer, etc.)

If your childhood lemonade stands were very successful, you may need to get out from behind that desk and into a public relations or sales position, right?  If you get excited just thinking about using those skills that may have been put on the shelf for a while, you’re on the right track to experiencing your new career!

Examine your skills.  You will see a mix of the following characteristics.  These will help you determine the best career path.

Influence.  You have a knack for influencing people through leadership, public speaking, marketing, motivating (not manipulating).

  • Organize.   Your organizational and monitoring/tracking ability help keep you and others managed and on track.
  • Helps.  You derive enjoyment from teaching, encouraging, nurturing and counseling.
  • Creative: You are artistic, theatrical or creative in designing products or environments.
  • Analytical.  You enjoy using math, analyzing data or keeping up with the latest scientific advancements.
  • Producer.  You like to see the fruit of your labor using hands-on skills—cooking, crafts, and construction or building projects.
  • Adventuresome.  You are competitive or like to take risks—law enforcement, fire fighting, military, athletics.

It may take some time to overcome pre-conceived notions, family expectations, negative comments from teachers, etc., BUT it’s time to pursue YOUR Life’s Goal! Start writing your new life’s career goals now!

For more information on a seminars or personal coaching, contact Rita Rocker, Chief Communications and Image Officer, Transformation Academy, 402-968-3250 rita@transformationacademy.com, www.transformationacademy.